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As your company recruits for challenging positions you may find that local talent in the area is tapped out and you aren’t in a position where you can have this person work remotely.

relocationAt this point, it often makes sense to open up the search for talent nationally. However, as your search expands across the country, you are going to need to broach a topic that is just as important as a candidate’s skills: relocation, and their willingness to make a move for the right opportunity.

It’s easy for a candidate to say, yes, of course they are open to relocating for the right opportunity. However, as a recruiter, you will find that you need to truly vet out how serious a candidate is about potentially moving across the country for a job. It’s a huge step, especially if there is family or home ownership weighing in on the decision-making.

Here are a few tips for making sure candidates are really ready for relocation:

Plant the Seed Early

In the first or second conversation with the candidate, dig into their thoughts about the specific area the company is located in. Just as you relay information on the job or company, have facts and information ready to about the city in which they would be moving to. This way, the candidate is actually visualizing the area and thinking about how they (and perhaps their family) could fit in.

Don’t Ignore Hesitation

Do you sense that the candidate isn’t being 100 percent straightforward and may just be saying what you want to hear? Better just ignore that and let all their concerns come out after they decline the offer, right? NO, of course not!

If you sense a candidate is hesistant about moving (that’s ok, who wouldn’t have certain questions/concerns?), ask if they’re sure, then stop talking and listen. A little awkward silence can actually be beneficial as you might find that prompts them to open up.

It’s better to find out sooner than later about any changed expectations. If they actually think they would require more of a raise due to cost of living, or they need some time to sell their house, take note and relay this information to the hiring manager. More often than not, certain accommodations can be made with reasonable notice.

Give Them Resources

There are many resources online that can help candidates think the tactical process of relocation through.

A website called www.homefair.com has tools such as a salary calculator that gauges changes in cost of living, and a school report on rankings of the local schools. They also have financial planning calculators that can help candidates determine ideal mortgage rates, and conduct a benefit analysis on renting vs. buying.

To give even more details, offer resources that are specific to the city or town the company is located in. Every area has their own tourism/travel website that will showcase all the interesting activities and benefits of the area.

Relocating means something different to different candidates.

Everyone has a different living situation, so it’s important to fulfill your role as a recruiter and give all the information necessary to help candidates understand or remove any impediments that may come up once an offer is extended.

Katy Smigowski is responsible for recruiting initiatives for both the firm and its portfolio companies.

  • Lee – MoveInsure

    As part of offering services for relocation, see http://www.moveinsure.com for insuring your belongings during the move. Whether it is a domestic or international move, MoveInsure offers the best rates, coverage and service.

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